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rqsey_

Member
So- I decided why not post a thread where someone can post those weird, silly questions that they get in their heads and maybe try to answer some? So here it is--

Some silly questions I've asked myself in the past:

  • "Why is the sky blue?"
  • "Is water wet?"
  • "Is fire actually on fire?"
  • "Why when something gets so hot it feels cold?"
  • "What would living in a year like the 1500s be like?"

So yeah!! If you want you can leave your own silly questions below- <3
78175
 

rqsey_

Member
Well, I think it could swing two ways really- Some people could classify it as a smoothie, but other people wouldn't. So it's 50/50 if you wanna think about it. In my opinion, it's not a smoothie-
 
So- I decided why not post a thread where someone can post those weird, silly questions that they get in their heads and maybe try to answer some? So here it is--

Some silly questions I've asked myself in the past:

  • "Why is the sky blue?"
  • "Is water wet?"
  • "Is fire actually on fire?"
  • "Why when something gets so hot it feels cold?"
  • "What would living in a year like the 1500s be like?"

So yeah!! If you want you can leave your own silly questions below- <3
View attachment 78175
1. The atmosphere reflects the ocean, which we perceive to be blue.
2. Yes water is wet.
3. Fire is a heat reaction. A log can be on fire, but fire cannot. It just IS fire.
Idk the other two
 

Shuhua

Active Member
Is cereal soup?
I believe this to actually be a very interesting question.

Think about all of the things that regular, average people consider to be "soups". All of these concoctions are mainly comprised of things that are able to be consumed in their liquid state (or, for some reason, are seen to be as more 'enjoyable' by the vast majority of people that are interested in these products) along with (usually) some smaller fragments of solid foods (e.g. pork bone, peas, carrots). We can also view this predicament using scientific terminology—with the soup base itself being the solvent while the fragments of solid foods are the solutes. This comprises, in essence, a heterogenous mixture.

However, the issue comes into play when we look at the case of cereal itself, and cross-analyze it with typical soups. We often confuse typical soups with stews, which appear to be served warm and hot in most instances. On the other hand, we have to remember that not all soups are, in fact, served at above room-temperature. Cereal is typically served chilled, with milk fresh and cold from the fridge, and the cereal from a box, stored in a dry and cool place (such as a pantry). Many Asian desserts are chilled soups. This, moreover, suggests the idea that cereals can be considered soups.

To analyze the conflict in question, it is obvious that the only reason that this may be a widely debated issue stems from the issue of what we believe to be considered "soup" versus what "soup" actually pertains to. While you may consider one thing to be true, you are ignoring the fact that the issue you are considering actually is not so narrow as it seems to be—it is much wider and much more inclusive.

Please consider the comparative below, analyzing various characteristics of two soups—to be specific, cereal (typical cold milk and grain) and chicken noodle soup. For the purposes of the analytical table below, "soup" is clearly defined as "a concoction consisting of a base-liquid in which the fragmented components are suspended within, excluding mixtures in which these fragmented components become one thorough mixture within the base."

Criterion CerealChicken Noodle Soup
TemperatureRelatively coldRelatively hot
Component(s)Milk, grain/wheat/oatsSoup base, chicken, noodles, additive vegetables
Time servedBreakfast, lunch, dinner, midnight, 2 am when you're hungry and your parents are asleepWhen you're sick (because honestly, who even wants chicken noodle soup when they're not sick in bed?)
Relation to "soup" in comparison to definition proposed of "soup"Consists of base-liquid and fragmented components (grain/wheat/oats)Consists of soup base (base-liquid) and fragmented components (chicken, noodles, additive vegetables)

As you can derive from the information displayed above, we can conclude that, in reference to the definition provided above, cereal is a soup.

You could also consider dirty toilet water to be a soup—toilet paper isn't the solvent, is it?
 

rqbyslippers

Active Member
I believe this to actually be a very interesting question.

Think about all of the things that regular, average people consider to be "soups". All of these concoctions are mainly comprised of things that are able to be consumed in their liquid state (or, for some reason, are seen to be as more 'enjoyable' by the vast majority of people that are interested in these products) along with (usually) some smaller fragments of solid foods (e.g. pork bone, peas, carrots). We can also view this predicament using scientific terminology—with the soup base itself being the solvent while the fragments of solid foods are the solutes. This comprises, in essence, a heterogenous mixture.

However, the issue comes into play when we look at the case of cereal itself, and cross-analyze it with typical soups. We often confuse typical soups with stews, which appear to be served warm and hot in most instances. On the other hand, we have to remember that not all soups are, in fact, served at above room-temperature. Cereal is typically served chilled, with milk fresh and cold from the fridge, and the cereal from a box, stored in a dry and cool place (such as a pantry). Many Asian desserts are chilled soups. This, moreover, suggests the idea that cereals can be considered soups.

To analyze the conflict in question, it is obvious that the only reason that this may be a widely debated issue stems from the issue of what we believe to be considered "soup" versus what "soup" actually pertains to. While you may consider one thing to be true, you are ignoring the fact that the issue you are considering actually is not so narrow as it seems to be—it is much wider and much more inclusive.

Please consider the comparative below, analyzing various characteristics of two soups—to be specific, cereal (typical cold milk and grain) and chicken noodle soup. For the purposes of the analytical table below, "soup" is clearly defined as "a concoction consisting of a base-liquid in which the fragmented components are suspended within, excluding mixtures in which these fragmented components become one thorough mixture within the base."

CriterionCerealChicken Noodle Soup
TemperatureRelatively coldRelatively hot
Component(s)Milk, grain/wheat/oatsSoup base, chicken, noodles, additive vegetables
Time servedBreakfast, lunch, dinner, midnight, 2 am when you're hungry and your parents are asleepWhen you're sick (because honestly, who even wants chicken noodle soup when they're not sick in bed?)
Relation to "soup" in comparison to definition proposed of "soup"Consists of base-liquid and fragmented components (grain/wheat/oats)Consists of soup base (base-liquid) and fragmented components (chicken, noodles, additive vegetables)

As you can derive from the information displayed above, we can conclude that, in reference to the definition provided above, cereal is a soup.

You could also consider dirty toilet water to be a soup—toilet paper isn't the solvent, is it?
how did you have the strength to write all that..
 
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